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Sundays: 9:00am & 10:45am Worship + Bible Studies | Wednesdays: 6:45pm Community Groups + Students + Kids

NEXT GEN: STUDENTS

Our Purpose: To come alongside parents, grandparents, and families and help equip them for the incredible joy and challenge of raising up the next generation in Christ. We are passionate about partnering with families as they train their students in the truth of God’s Word and as they point them continually to the glory and goodness of Jesus Christ. Want to partner with us in this journey of discipling our families? Bookmark this page, subscribe to the blog, and share this post and others with your families, friends, and neighbors on social media and other avenues. And of course, feel free to comment with thoughts, questions, and topics you want us to discuss in the future. We’d be thrilled to hear from you. Know that you are loved and that you are being prayed for.

October Newsletter

by: Keri Yates

10/07/2019

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Hi Parents!

We are so thrilled to have your student be a part of what God is doing in Community Students. It is our goal to partner with you, which is why we are on a mission to make sure we send out at least one email every other month to let you know what is going on in our Student Ministry!

COMING UP ON WEDNESDAYS AT CATALYST!!


On October 2nd, we are looking forward to starting a new series at Catalyst (Wednesday night student program) called "Not a Fan." This is going to be a great series! After this 4-week series,… read more

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Hi Parents!

We are so thrilled to have your student be a part of what God is doing in Community Students. It is our goal to partner with you, which is why we are on a mission to make sure we send out at least one email every other month to let you know what is going on in our Student Ministry!

COMING UP ON WEDNESDAYS AT CATALYST!!


On October 2nd, we are looking forward to starting a new series at Catalyst (Wednesday night student program) called "Not a Fan." This is going to be a great series! After this 4-week series, the students will know what it means to be a FOLLOWER of Jesus, not just a fan. We are looking forward to seeing how God uses this topic to challenge the students in asking themselves the question, "Am I just a fan or am I a follower?"

Starting October 30th, we will be digging into the Attributes of God with the series called “God Is…..” Please encourage your student to be here and to invite a friend. They will NOT want to miss out!


Each Sunday during the 10:45 service, after worship and communion in the Worship Center, students (7th through 12th grades) have the opportunity to go to the Community Center for Deeper (Sunday morning student Bible study). We are excited to take students deeper into God’s Word. We will be continuing in 1 Kings and 2 Kings, learning that after Kings David and Solomon the Kingdom of Israel was split in two as a judgment of Solomon’s idolatry: the Northern Kingdom of Israel and the Southern Kingdom of Judah. In spite of the idolatry that often marked both kingdoms, God continued to speak to His people through the words of His prophets and the signs of His power. Students will engage in biblical discussions and real-life application as they grow in their knowledge of who God is.


Thank you for letting us partner with you in discipling your students to be fully devoted followers of Christ. We look forward to showing the students each week what it looks like to love GOD and love OTHERS!

Blessings!!
Keri Yates
STUDENT MINISTRY | IMPACT


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Three Things This Week!

by: Keri Yates

10/07/2019

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Three Things This Week

1. TikTok Teen

What it is:16-year-old Alabama teen Haley Sharpe suddenly became “a little bit famous” on TikTok.

Why it’s worth a conversation:Boasting 100,000 followers is quite different from having millions, but Haley is “on her way to getting the thing she wants, the thing all her friends want...the kind of social media following wherein performing your life online becomes a paying job.” It’s a noble goal, carving out a career path that provides the funds to live a flourishing life. But here’s the concern: Most occupations offer the world something. They provide a service or value… read more

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Three Things This Week

1. TikTok Teen

What it is:16-year-old Alabama teen Haley Sharpe suddenly became “a little bit famous” on TikTok.

Why it’s worth a conversation:Boasting 100,000 followers is quite different from having millions, but Haley is “on her way to getting the thing she wants, the thing all her friends want...the kind of social media following wherein performing your life online becomes a paying job.” It’s a noble goal, carving out a career path that provides the funds to live a flourishing life. But here’s the concern: Most occupations offer the world something. They provide a service or value that enriches human life. Doctors heal, police officers protect, teachers teach. Can we say the same for social media stars? Is being an online influencer a noble profession? Why or why not? If your teens are wrestling with their calling, Parker Palmer’s bookLet Your Life Speak may really speak to them!

2. No Joke

What it is:One of the most controversial films of 2019, Joker starring Joaquin Phoenix, released on Thursday night.

Why it’s complicated:The film centers on the sympathetic origin story of mentally ill and socially ignored Arthur (the Joker) who ultimately unleashes his psychopathic rage in a series of violent gun attacks. Both praised as a cinematic marvel and criticized as a potential threat to public safety, the film has prompted more police patrols at theaters, forcing Warner Brothers to release a statement condemning gun violence—all while profiting from the narrative. Director Todd Philips says the film doesn’t so much offer an apologetic for the Joker’s violence but rather points to the root of his evil, which is a “lack of love, childhood trauma, and lack of compassion in the world.” If your teens want to see the film, here’s a great conversation starter: Where’s the line between telling an authentic, gritty story and promoting harmful behavior?

3. Bieber Bliss

What it is: A year after their courtroom wedding, Justin Bieber and Hailey Baldwin tied the knot again in areligious ceremony in South Carolina.

Why it’s nice, we guess:Bieber recently admitted to a drug-filled lifestyle where he made “every bad decision you could have thought of,” so the fact he’s rebuilt his life and is committing himself to marriage is fantastic. But with all the hype,Instagram posts, and highly orchestrated fanfare, the event felt more like a corporate branding launch than a wedding. Is anything sacred anymore? Can two people, albeit two very famous people, do anything these days without posting and promoting it publicly? Whether it’s Bieber or your kids, what is lost when we overshare, when a sacred moment like a wedding or vacation is contrived into an opportunity to garner more likes, more views, and more followers? If you ask your kids these questions, do their responses differ from yours?

To Forgive or Not to Forgive

This week marked the verdict of Amber Guyger, the former police officer who shot and killed her downstairs neighbor, Botham Jean, in what she claimed was a case of mistaken identity. Guyger was sentenced to 10 years in jail—a move some justice advocates celebrated, while others mourned, saying it was too lenient. The story of Guyger’s sentence grew more complicated when Jean’s brother, Brandt, spoke to the courtroom afterward. He told Guyger and the judge that he didn’t want to see his brother’s killer go to jail and that he forgave her. He then asked the judge if he could “give her a hug” as a sign of his forgiveness. The two embraced in a video that immediately (predictably) went viral.

In prior years, the sheer weight of Brandt’s action might have simply been seen as symbolic of one man’s grace, the choice to forgive in the face of the unforgivable. And though the beautiful simplicity of his gesture remains, in 2019, nothing stays simple for long. A thousand think pieces on the ways thatBlack forgiveness of white violence is fetishized and fawned over seemed to appear immediately on social media. What are we to make of a culture where even the act of radical forgiveness can be viewed as another symptom of injustice?

As Jesus’ followers, we are commanded to forgive wrongs both small and grievous, personally and corporately. We do this not for the sake of the wrongdoer, not as a gift to the wounding party, but as a present to ourselves. It is in every way a step toward freedom. And unlike the social media outcry might have us believe, forgiveness and justice aren’t mutually exclusive; they're actually two sides of the same coin. But don’t confuse forgiveness with absolution: “Forgiveness does not mean that we make believe the injustice never happened.” Systemic oppression or personal abuse can’t simply be “hugged out.” Without justice for such egregious sins, mercy is almost impossible to give because the wrong committed is never acknowledged. Without mercy, justice can become a bloody, vengeful sword. But together, reconciliation is born. A conversation with your teen about what forgiveness is and who it’s for might be well-timed around this very public debate.

Keep the Faith!

Editor’s Note: links to many different sources within this e-newsletter; a link does not equal an endorsement. We cannot guarantee the content of each site (especially its ads). Please be forewarned.

**Article by Axis Team Vol 5 Issue 39
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What’s A VSCO Girl? And Other Translations From Your Teen’s Secret Language-This post originally appeared on NICOLEPILGRIM.COM

by: Keri Yates

10/02/2019

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There have been so many moments as a parent that I have to sit back and laugh at the irony of it all. While I’m steadily approaching middle age and somehow can’t ever remember where I put my car keys, I can still remember my TEEN YEARS in vivid detail.

Those years of friendships, experiences, and trends are tightly woven together in my memory.

We were not much different from the teens of today.

For decades, each generation of teens has adopted their own language that seems to be indecipherable to the common outsider.

Not unlike remote tribal communities. Or an ANGRY… read more

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There have been so many moments as a parent that I have to sit back and laugh at the irony of it all. While I’m steadily approaching middle age and somehow can’t ever remember where I put my car keys, I can still remember my TEEN YEARS in vivid detail.

Those years of friendships, experiences, and trends are tightly woven together in my memory.

We were not much different from the teens of today.

For decades, each generation of teens has adopted their own language that seems to be indecipherable to the common outsider.

Not unlike remote tribal communities. Or an ANGRY TODDLER.

I distinctly remember moms in our generation asking what in the world we were talking about. We giggled and rolled our eyes, lamenting the fact that our parents were, “like, so totally lame!” If our parents ever tried to speak our language, they would have been met with “gag me with a spoon”.

We would have told them they were being so “cheesy” when they asked why we said some cute boy was “all that and a bag of chips”. When they got frustrated or upset with us, we’d simply heave a sigh and mutter, “ok, don’t have a cow.”

We had our own language, unique to our generation.

My own daughters are now teens, and like each new generation, they have adopted a language of their own. Teens can certainly be difficult to understand and relate to. How do you effectively communicate with someone who will soon be receiving college acceptance letters while simultaneously appearing physically unable to put the toilet paper on the roll?

It seems like we are in a constant state of furrowed brow as we work hard to gain a little bit of insight into their ever changing world.

My teens were gracious enough to let me peek into their culture by sharing with me a few examples of the language they speak.

I don’t take the privilege lightly. It’s like sharing a secret code that is held tightly in their grip, only spoken within their circles. As a fellow parent, I now pass this information on to you. If nothing more than to simply peel back one more layer when it comes to understanding our teenagers and how they function in their natural habitat.

Here Are Five Slang Phrases You May Hear From Your Teen:

“And I oop! Sksksksksksk”

This is the phrase that baffles me beyond all reason, so it wins the top spot of our little list. What in the actual heck?!

I’ve heard it spoken out in the wild, and while it varies in dialect, it’s definitely a phrase used by many teen girls no matter what environment we find them in. I was watching my daughter’s volleyball game and someone hit the ball out of bounds.

A chorus of “And I oop! Sksksksksksk” came from the back of the bleachers, followed by giggles. It happened repeatedly.

One evening I was giving some teenage friends a ride home and someone dropped a water bottle on the floor of the back seat, and right on cue, “And I oop! Sksksksksk.”So basically, “and I oop” means something takes you by surprise or happens unexpectedly.

The origin of “sksksksksksk” is anybody’s guess, but from a little internet research and questioning of ACTUAL TEENS, it is the equivalent of laughing uncontrollably or the new “omg” as a quick response to anything. Now that we have that one out of the way…

Spill The Tea

If you have a teen, you’ve likely heard this and know by now they aren’t referring to a beverage. “Tea” is the new word for gossip.

You will likely hear this used most commonly in the phrase “Spill the tea, sis”, which means they’re asking their friend for the latest gossip.

It’s the equivalent to us asking for “the 4-1-1” back in our day. I would advise that you don’t attempt to engage in conversation with your teen as she walks in the front door after coming home from a social event by asking, “So what’s the tea?!”

This may result in eye rolling of extreme proportions and her begging you to never utter that phrase again as long as you live. Ask me how I know.

VSCO (pronounced “visco”) and Basic

I’m combining these two because they’re seemingly interchangeable for the most part. VSCO is an online editing app and has morphed from being a noun to an adjective. It’s used to describe popular styles uploaded to the app.

This includes girls (“VSCO Girls”) who wear oversized shirts and scrunchies, shell necklaces, Birkenstocks, and carry a Hydroflask water bottle covered in stickers. So pretty much the majority of girls you see walking around the halls of any given high school.

The image of a VSCO girl is equivalent to a casual lifestyle. And if someone is “basic”, it’s implied that they maintain this image as well.

Ship

Go ahead and remove any image of an actual ship from your mind. It’s not even close. “Ship” refers to a romantic relationship.

Someone may post a picture of a couple on social media and ask for approval by posing the question, “Do you ship it?” After doing a little research, apparently it began as a reference to fictional characters, but has now taken on real life relationSHIPs.

Yep.

Took me forever to make the connection.

Lit

This one drums up a bit of a different meaning for those of us who were born in the previous century. But today, kids are saying something is “lit” when it’s really good. Again, as with all teen slang, I would not recommend inserting this one into your own adult conversations. Stating “My new adjusted lower mortgage rate is so lit!” would not be advised.

Teenagers have a secret language that happens with every generation. Trying to keep up?  Here are some translations for the language your teenager might be speaking. From VSCO girls to and I oop ssksskssk we've got the translations for you #teenagers #VSCOgirl #filterfreeparents

Remember, the language of teens is fleeting.

In fact, I suggested the terms “cringy” and “Bye, Felicia” and was informed that “those are so last year”. This very list is likely to be outdated by the time this post is actually published. But for now, use this as a stepping stone to help navigate the language of your teenager.

While they may be annoyed at my prodding and questioning, I hope that my teens secretly appreciate my interest in their world and the things that matters to them.

We don’t have to actually speak their language (as previously mentioned, it is recommended that you don’t even try) to show that we value them and who they are. Teens want to be heard and understood, just like the rest of us.

The teen years are shaping up to be one of my most favorite stages of parenting. They are quickly becoming miniature versions of their future adult selves, and they’re going to be such amazing, fun people!

That is, of course, once they figure out how to stop leaving the cap off the toothpaste and smoothie cups sitting in their bedroom for over a month. Ugh. Gag me with a spoon!

This post originally appeared on NICOLEPILGRIM.COM

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